SUNY Downstate News: November 2017

October 6-12 marked  National Physician Assistant (PA) Week

October 19th was “Wear Purple to Work Day” to raise awareness for Domestic Violence.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

On November 11 Veterans Day was observed


SUNY Downstate Announcements:

-Shirley Girouard, Professor and Associate Dean for Research and Innovation at Downstate’s College of Nursing, received the Mary Jane M. Williams Diamond Jubilee Lifetime Achievement Award in Nursing from the Connecticut Nurses Association.

-On October 22 ,2017, a team of residents, medical students, and others participated in the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s Community Walk in Manhattan. The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention is at the forefront of research, advocacy, education, and prevention initiatives designed to reduce loss of life resulting from suicide.

-On October 24, 2017, Dr. Dilip Nath, Assistant Vice President and Deputy Chief Information Officer of Information Services, was awarded a Citation of Honor by Queens Borough President, Melina Katz, for his outstanding contribution to civil activism.

-The National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded Downstate a $10 million grant to form a translational health disparities research program, with a specific focus on recruiting and training underrepresented minority scientists.

-Jeffrey Putman, Vice President for Student Affairs, Dean of Students, was honored by The College Student Personnel Association of New York State for with the “Outstanding Contribution to the Profession” award.

-Downstate had winners in multiple sections at the New York Chapter—American College of Physicians (NYACP) Resident and Medical Student Forum on October 28th .Downstate students/trainees won first and second place in the Medical Student Clinical Vignette Category (Muhammad Yaasen Bhutta and Benjamin Parnes), first place in the Medical Student Research Category (Justina Ray), and third place in the Resident and Fellow Clinical Vignette (Odeth Barrett-Campbell, MD).

-On October 25, Rep. Yvette D. Clarke, the Congressional Caucus on Black Women and Girls, and Black Women’s Health Imperative hosted a briefing entitled, “Black Women’s Health: Where do we go from Here” in Washington, DC.
Alumna, Marcia Edmond-Bucknor, MD’04, Assistant Professor/Medical Director, Dept. of Family Medicine-Family Health Services, presented on how the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has impacted Black women’s access to care from the perspective of the medical community.

– Dr. Richard H. Schwarz, passed on November 9, 2017. Dr. Schwarz has served Downstate as Chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Provost, and finally, Acting President from 1978 to 1994. He also served as Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Methodist Hospital. Downstate honors his life and legacy.


Innovations in Medicine:

Dr. Samuel Márquez, Associate Professor of Cell Biology and Co-Director of Gross Cell Biology in the College of Medicine, co-authored an article in the October issue of The Anatomical Record entitled, “Cranial Indicators Identified for Peak Incidence of Otitis Media.” The article describes reconstruction of the cartilaginous Eustachian tube at different stages of growth.

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Class Notes: November 2017

Class Notes:

Jerome G. Porush, MD’55
Dr. Porush states “he is still reading some journals, golfing, traveling, and enjoying his large family.

Sidney Winawer, MD’56
I am enjoying my more relaxed Emeritus status with a combination of research and papers with young faculty while partaking of many music and cultural activities in Manhattan, golf in East Hampton and a bunch of kids and grandkids with my wife Barbara. I’ve taken up jazz piano and still give an occasional lecture. Life and medicine remains joyful.

Stratos G. Kantounis, MD’58
Dr. Kantounis states he is “finally retired from surgery and is still teaching medical students. His wife Joan is still painting.

Alan M. Lobovits, MD’74
The New England Center for Children® (NECC®), a global leader in education for children with autism, announced today the election of Dr. Alan Lobovits to the Board of Directors. Dr. Lobovits is a pediatrician with Southboro Medical Group and an expert on developmental disabilities in children. To read the complete article click here.

Evan J. Fliegal, MD’83
Dr. Fliegal has been practicing Int. Med for 27 year in Athens, Georgia and has two happily married daughters. He also states “Go #1 Georgia Bulldawgs.”

Michael S. Sinel, MD’85
Dr.Sinel board-certified back pain specialist, will hosted a chess event for homeless youth in his Venice, California home on October 25th. “The chess event for homeless youth is Dr. Sinel’s initiative to contribute to the community. He is hosting the one-day chess session in partnership with Safe Place for Youth, an organization dedicated to addressing the fundamental needs of homeless youth in the area. With aid, assistance and donation from Board Members, donors, volunteers and partner organizations, SPY has remained steadfast in providing food, clothing and socks as primary forms of assistance to the recipients.” To read more about the event and Dr.Sinel click here.

Laura Frado, MD’11 & Steven D. Rosenblatt, MD’11
Drs. Frado and Rosenblatt have been happily married for 3 years and are now both practicing in Manhattan. Laura has joined New York Gastroenterology Associates on the Upper East Side as an adult gastroenterologist. She is also an Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital. Laura completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Columbia University/New York Presbyterian Hospital and her gastroenterology & hepatology fellowship at the University of Rochester/Strong Memorial Hospital.

Steven is an Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery at Weill Cornell Medicine/New York Presbyterian Hospital specializing in Pediatric Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery. He completed his otolaryngology residency at the University of Rochester/Strong Memorial Hospital and his fellowship in Pediatric Otolaryngology at Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School. Laura and Steven are excited to be back in NYC and to reconnect with classmates and friends.


In Memoriam:
Robert H. Jaros, MD’68
Robert H. “Dr. Bob” Jaros, 74, of 360 Patten Road, Shelburne died March 26, 2017.

Wilsa Ryder, MD’73
Wilsa Jane Ryder, MD, long of Provincetown, departed this life on Saturday, October 28, in Boston, with her family in attendance. She had experienced declining health in recent times, but succumbed to an acute pneumonia, at the Massachusetts General Hospital. To read an article on Dr. Ryder featured on a local newspaper website click here.

Student Profile – Malcolm Winkle

This month’s SUNY Downstate College of Medicine student profile is of Malcolm Winkle, class of 2018. Malcolm completed his undergraduate education at The Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education- The City College of NY where he majored in Biomedical Sciences.

What is/will be your specialty? Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Who is/was your favorite professor at SUNY Downstate College of Medicine and why?
Dr. John Delury and Dr. Elliot Dehaan (both infectious Disease Doctors); they both take their time when assessing patients, rounding with their respective teams, and allowing students to take advanced roles in caring for patients; they both are excellent listeners and encourage team input and teach to better orient the team to the most important problems that a patient faces.

What is your favorite memory so far of your time studying at SUNY Downstate College of Medicine?
Receiving aid from the Alumni Association to study cancer pain mechanisms at NYU College of Dentistry for 6 months where I decided what my specialty was going to be.

How has the Alumni Association for the College of Medicine at SUNY Downstate helped you?
The Alumni Association has supported me with research stipends, networking opportunities with local physiatrists, and CV editing for the residency match. Pretty much anything career-oriented I can think of that I need help with I feel comfortable speaking to the Alumni Association and am confident that they can provide optimal support.

Is there anything else that you think Alumni would like to know about you?
I plan on assisting the Association in any way that I can in the future. I am grateful for its support.

How has the Alumni Association influenced your experience at SUNY Downstate?
The Alumni Association has served as a one stop shop for career guidance that is flexible to any need that I may have. It has made my time at Downstate more enriching by opening opportunities that I didn’t know were available to me: networking, stipends, resume/CV development and more. Downstate is a large organization and having the Alumni Association makes it easier to find the things you need.

When did you know you wanted to become a doctor?
When I was in high school I had the opportunity to shadow physicians. I enjoyed the patient-doctor relationship that my advisors had with their patients and how much patients trusted their physician’s recommendations and judgement.

First Year Mentoring Program

The Mentoring Program sponsored by the Alumni Association has continued to be a positive addition to the Medical Student experience here at SUNY Downstate College of Medicine. To date, the program has served over 2,000 students and procured the services of about 270 faculty and alumni.

Students are provided with an opportunity to engage with other medical students and faculty.  In the month of September, 5 MS1 mentoring sessions were held. First year students were matched with  faculty mentors.

Faculty mentors can answer questions about what being a physician demands and provide students patients and clinical practice insight.

The Mentoring program also goes beyond MS1 student – faculty mentoring. Other programs include having one-on-one lunch with a faculty mentor in their office to see how first hand medicine is practiced and panel discussions involving insight into specialty fields.

Please contact Mrs. Dionne Davis-Lowe, the Mentoring and Alumni Career Program Coordinator at (718)270-7593 or dionne.davis@downstate.edu, if you have any questions or would like additional information.


First Year Student Profile – Ana Maria Lopez

This month’s special edition student profile is of first year medical student Ana Maria Lopez, class of 2021. In this profile she included her dog, Pancake Lopez, who is accompanying her on her journey to becoming a doctor. Ana Maria completed her undergraduate education The City College of New York.

Hometown: Valley Stream, Long Island and Buffalo, NY

 Potential specialty: Cardiology ❤

What inspired you to study medicine? I have an extreme love for the biological sciences. I also desire to help and potentially inspire people through my profession. What could be a better choice?

How is your family handling the fact that you’re in med school now? They are overly thrilled and amazingly supportive. Pancake: Grandma takes care of me when Mommy has it super busy.

How did you choose Downstate? I did a few summer programs at Downstate during my undergraduate career and fell in love with the school.  Pancake: I was born in Brooklyn, so I figured I’d return.

How does it feel to actually start med school? It feels like a huge weight has been lifted while simultaneously a larger weight has been added! But seriously, I feel so super blessed and excited to finally be here. Pancake: I don’t know what Mom is stressed about. I am having a wonderfully stress free time. I’m happy I get to see so many people on my walks. Also, I get to sleep when we study!

Student Profile – Zaki Azam

This month’s SUNY Downstate College of Medicine student profile is of Zaki Azam, class of 2019. Zaki completed his undergraduate education right here in our borough at Brooklyn College, where got his Bachelors in Science in Psychology. He is still unsure about his future specialty in Medicine but has had some remarkable experiences here at Downstate.

Who is/was your favorite professor at SUNY Downstate College of Medicine and why?

“My favorite professor is Dr. Eisner, because she always pushes her students to achieve even more than they think is possible.”

What is your favorite memory so far of your time studying at SUNY Downstate College of Medicine?

“My favorite memory is attending the AAMC Conference in Seattle with the faculty and Dean of the College of Medicine. I got to know them personally while presenting on the importance of student and faculty wellness.”

How has the Alumni Association for the College of Medicine at SUNY Downstate helped you (scholarships, clubs, events, white-coat ceremony, senior week, research, summer research, technology, healthcare in developing countries elective or other)?

“The Alumni Association has helped me realize great strengths through projects I would otherwise not have had an opportunity to pursue. Given the funding to present at a national conference has not only encouraged me but also gave me the confidence to continue formulating new ideas and present in such settings in the future. I look forward to the next time I can count on the Alumni Association for assistance whether it be for research, presentations or more.”

Equal Opportunity Funding

The Alumni Association remains committed to diverse and inclusive practices.

Diverse and Inclusive practices are subjects many organizations often speak about, but seldom practice, however  the Alumni Association – College of Medicine SUNY Downstate, is not one the aforementioned organizations. Staying true to the vision of the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, the Alumni Association remains committed to serving the broad spectrum of individuals that attend SUNY Downstate’s medical school.

Recognizing differing ideologies based on life experience, culture, language, and ethnic background, leads to profound innovations in medicine.

The Alumni Association is proud support Downstate’s minority students with scholarships every year, funded by our generous donors.

This year we provided over $67,859, to African-American, Latino, and Native-American medical students. Depending on your definition of minority/under represented, if we include Asian-American students we have provided over $220,677 this year.

To donate to one of our scholarships to support under-represented individuals at the College of Medicine or to support any of our initiatives that insure medical students have access to the best education possible, click the link provided below. If you have any questions about different ways to contribute do not hesitate to call the Alumni Association office at (718)-270-2075.

Link to donate:  https://www.downstate.edu/alumni/alumni-giving/index.html

World AIDS Day at SUNY Downstate, Brooklyn, New York

Throughout today, panels from the AIDS quilt are on display in the atrium of the Basic Science Building for SUNY Downstate. We remember those people who have passed away during the epidemic, and those who continue to die from this disease. We celebrate those survivors and the amazing modern medicine that has made survival possible.

SUNY Downsate events for World AIDS Day
quilts2Photo Eric Shoen-Ukre

December 1, 2016
Display of panels from the AIDS Memorial Quilt, sponsored by the Student Center Governing Board. Also a display of Survivor Panels, created by Downstate’s STAR Program, to celebrate the resilience of people living with HIV.
Basic Science Building Atrium
9 am – 4 pm


STAR Health Center Annual World AIDS Day Program
This year’s program focuses on pre-exposure prophylaxis (PreP) and post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), featuring real life stories from patients and staff about PreP and HIV.
Alumni Auditorium
11:30 am – 12:30 pm
Reception to follow in Lecture Hall 1B


December 2

Adolescent Education Program’s and Diaspora Community Services
World AIDS Day: A Teen Town Hall 2016 Event
Peer leaders and Youth Advocates of the BATES Network come together to remove the stigma of the virus and to champion their peers to do the same. Join them in making your voice heard.
Alumni Auditorium
5 – 8 pm


December 2
2016 World AIDS Day
Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams will present an award to Dr. Monica Sweeney, ’75, Vice Dean for Global Engagement and Chair of Health Policy & Management in the School of Public Health, for her years of dedication and accomplishments.
Brooklyn Borough Hall
209 Joralemon Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201
5 – 8 pm


December 4
Health Center, airing on local TV channels
Topic: World AIDS
Featuring: Host Dr. Monica Sweeney

Airs:
Sunday, December 4 – 11:30 am, on BronxNet, Channel 70
Monday, December 5 – 10am and 5 pm, on Brooklyn Community Access Television (BCAT) Channel 69;
Friday, December 9 –  7:30 am, on Manhattan Neighborhood Network (MNN) Channel 56.

SUNY Downstate


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Brooklyn Health Disparities Center: Conversations on Patient Adherence

 

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The Brooklyn Health Disparities Center, a partnership between SUNY Downstate, Arthur Ashe Institute for Public Health and the Office of the Brooklyn Borough President, is hosting the Friday, Nov. 4 Interdisciplinary Dialogues on Patient Adherence conference.

“Our goal is to engage key stakeholders in addressing this critical issue. Therefore, the target audience includes physicians, nurses, community health workers, community-based organizations, community providers, faith-based leaders, pharmacists, pharmaceutical industry members, healthcare systems leaders, educators, and political leaders,” according to Moro Salifu, MD, MBA, MPH, FACP, Director, Brooklyn Health Disparities Center.

Participants/Presenters include SUNY Drs. Salifu, Lewis, Fraser, Boutin-Foster, Wilson, Cukor, Boutjidir, Kaplan, and more.

The conference Friday, Nov. 4, 2016, runs from 8:30 am to 3:30 pm in the Alumni Auditorium at 395 Lenox Road, Brooklyn, NY 11203. To register, and for more information, please visit the Brooklyn Health Disparities Event page here.


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Leave Downstate and Go Anywhere: Diversity and a Vision for Urban Health

A conversation with Carla Boutin-Foster, MD ’94, MS
SUNY Downstate Associate Dean for Diversity Education & Research
Carla Boutin-Foster, MD

The SUNY Downstate Office of Diversity Education and Research supports diverse students interested in pursuing medical education. It’s an important initiative for SUNY Downstate, Dr. Boutin-Foster said. The students are increasingly diverse, medicine is increasingly global, and Brooklyn, in particular, provides a singular opportunity to develop standards to impact urban health worldwide.

Support for a diverse community
“The office was formerly known as the Office of Minority Affairs, but we changed the name when I got here. I wanted to be more inclusive of what diversity is. I really wanted to capture differences in perspectives, experiences and abilities, as well as gender identity, sexual orientation and gender. I wanted it to be more comprehensive in our approach and, in doing so, allow more talents to contribute to the diversity that is Downstate.

“The office is really here to allow students who may sometimes feel marginalized, or may have barriers because of the way they look, the way they sound – any attributes that are placed upon them, and any barriers that happen as a result of that. We want to be a place where we talk about it, and where we embrace differences, look at similarities and bring about change. The students are telling me what to do, really. They live this every day.”

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Improving medical care
“Diversity, for me, is about providing patients with the best quality of care possible. SUNY Downstate happens to be in a community that’s largely minority. Our doctors need to understand that when you see a patient, you’re seeing their culture, their family, the stressors placed upon them. You’re sometimes seeing bias inflicted upon them. You’re seeing the total patient.

“And diversity, for me, is a way to address that. I think the more diverse a medical school is, the more likely students are to learn from each other, and to realize, ‘Wow, we’re from different places, and we do the same thing.’ You focus on differences when you don’t know someone. When you get to know someone, you realize we’re the same.

“It’s important for medicine. It’s important for student education, so students can function in an increasingly global society. I mean, Brooklyn is global. You’ll speak with someone who is from Bangladesh, and you’ll go to another patient, and they’re from Haiti or Russia. I want students to be able to ask questions. But it comes with being comfortable. If you’ve never interacted with a minority group and the first person you see is a patient who’s vulnerable, and sick – that will impact the treatment of that patient, inadvertently. So, it’s about providing the best care for our patients, and providing the most enriched medical education for the students who come here, and diversity does that.”

bar-chartEvents

The Office of Diversity Education and Research hosted its first event in July for diverse residents, fellows and fourth-year students, supported by Joseph Merlino, MD, Faculty Affairs and Professional Development, Kevin Antoine, JD, Diversity and Inclusion, and Stephen Wadowski, MD ’87, Associate Dean for Graduate Medical Education.

In October, the office hosts an event for Latino heritage and health, and in February, focuses on minority men’s health. The theme shifts to women’s health in March, and to LGBT health and wellness in June.

“When I was at (Weill Cornell), there was a strong LGBT support group, and I worked with some amazing faculty and colleagues around that. They’ve done things like have a speaker on transgender health, and faculty from Callen Lorde in the Bronx. I’m looking really to build on that. Or if there’s something already happening with the Pride Club at Downstate, to be supportive.”

Students, faculty and alumni are invited to contact the office with ideas, Dr. Boutin-Foster said. Two fourth-year students are planning tours for local youth to Brooklyn cultural centers. A male faculty member volunteered as a mentor after witnessing professional inequity in the treatment of women in medical research.

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Professional past, preparation
Born in Haiti, Dr. Boutin-Foster’s family moved to Brooklyn when she was 5. She and her best friend decided in high school to study medicine to make a change in the world. Dr. Boutin-Foster first wanted to specialize in OB/GYN, when her classmates started to get pregnant, but ultimately chose internal medicine.

“It really started out as—I enjoyed science,” she said. “But it was public health, social change, that I wanted to do way back when, and medicine was one way to do it.”

Dr. Boutin-Foster completed her residency in Internal Medicine at New York Presbyterian, and earned a Master’s from the Weill Graduate School of Medical Sciences of Cornell University in Health Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology. She later served as an associate professor of medicine, associate professor of healthcare policy and research, and associate dean for diversity and inclusion at Weill Cornell Medical College.

faculty-diversity-final“After residency, I did a Health Services Research Fellowship, a clinical research fellowship to learn how to ask and answer questions using rigorous research methods. I started doing health disparities research and looking at social factors that impact health. So, I’m looking at diversity as a health behavior. How do you get people from diverse backgrounds to engage in the activity of medical education? I’m always thinking about the research question. What’s the evaluation outcome? Because that’s what we’re trying to do, trying to change behaviors. We’re trying to help people have cultural humility, and to be culturally sensitive and aware.

“I loved my residency, I loved my training at NY-P, you know, but coming back here, and seeing the patients and the students, and the community. And walking on Clarkson Avenue, and just seeing people’s lives, and being in the midst of this daily is something I hadn’t seen in such a long time. It’s been a tremendous blessing to come back and use what I learned, and to build on what’s already happening. There are a lot of folks here doing amazing things.

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Vision for Downstate
Dr. Boutin-Foster said she’d like more interdisciplinary programs between Downstate’s five schools. Each has a unique diversity profile, and all the schools, uniquely concentrated on one campus, could form complete models for urban health.

SUNY Downstate at Brooklyn can be the place “students and faculty come to learn how to train students in a culturally diverse community. How do you increase cultural awareness and sensitivity in this population? We’re the place that can really do it, and set the stage and create models. I’d like Downstate to be the place where faculty and students come to learn about social justice and equity, and with that, violence prevention.”

She wants the Brooklyn community, if asked, “What’s in Brooklyn?” to answer, “Well, we have the Barclays Center, we have Coney Island and we have SUNY Downstate.’”

“Downstate’s doing it,” Dr. Boutin-Foster said. “It’s happening here. Community is here. We want students to leave this place and know they can go anywhere in the world and practice medicine. The problems that we see here are everywhere – from Chicago, to LA, to Wisconsin. I think one of the ways to get students to stay, is letting them know what can be done here. This is what happens when you graduate from Downstate. You can go anywhere.”


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